BIOC 360: Research Perspectives in Biochemistry

BIOC 360 emphasizes how members of the scientific community read, think and write. The course includes practical advice and exercises in presenting scientific material. Lectures and discussions cover three areas: how we formulate scientific ideas, how we communicate scientific ideas and examples of how research is conducted in the Biochemistry Department.

BIOC360 emphasises how members of the scientific community read, think and write. The course includes practical advice and exercises in presenting scientific material. Lectures and tutorials cover four areas: how we formulate scientific ideas, how we communicate scientific ideas, examples of how research is conducted in the Biochemistry Department and how research in the Biochemistry Department fits in the wider New Zealand and international science environment.

Development of Scientific Ideas and the Scientific Method.

In these sessions we examine scientific research as an intellectual and social pursuit. You should develop an awareness of the context within which we work as scientists and an appreciation of the strengths and limitations of the modern scientific method. 

Presenting Science.

Most of your assessment, in both this course and others, requires you to write or otherwise clearly present scientific material. Practical advice, aimed at specific exercises, will refine the tools with which you do this. 

Interpreting Scientific Literature.

Analysis and critical evaluation of journal articles is a crucial skill for practicing scientists.  You will practice getting to grips with “the literature” in a series of written exercises and small group discussions.

Faculty Research Perspectives.

At 300 level your understanding should extend to include how we know about biochemical phenomena as well as what we know. Faculty of the Biochemistry Department will present examples from their own research of how we formulate and answer biochemical questions.

Postgraduate Mentors.

Students are matched with a graduate student who acts as a mentor. In this part of the course students experience firsthand the routines of researchers doing the fundamental work of experimental science.

Science in New Zealand.

In these sessions you learn how science in New Zealand is carried out and funded. This includes development of science policy and New Zealand’s National Science Challenges, and case studies of different research projects from basic science to commercialisation

Paper prescription on the University website